Al Capone Fan Club

THE FIRST ANNUAL CHICAGO GANGSTER CONVENTION

October 5, 2014 -- From 9:00 am to 9:00 pm

Visit CaponeConvention.com for all the details.

Note! CaponefanClub.com is NOT affiliated with Richard Larsen Films.

Al Capone Tiles

The Lexington Hotel was the site of Al Capone's headquarters, and was the location for the Neilson Ratings record breaking television special by Geraldo Rivera entitled "Capone's Secret Vault".

Larsen's son, Chris, recorded video footage of the demolition of the Lexington. The father and son team were at the demolition site at the perfect time to witness the demolition company breaking through the outer walls of the Lexington Hotel, to reach Capone's bathroom wall. When the outer walls were cleared, the green walls were revealed with the help of the million lumen lights that were shining on the building.

See the video below...

Al Capone... Ruthless?

Okay, we've had a few people come onto this site and ask us how we can build a site about Al Capone, a ruthless murderer, and call it a fan club. Well, to be honest, we really don't feel that any other human being in the world concerned with self preservation would have acted any different than Al Capone did back in the early 1900's. And all things considered, the man contributed substantially to society.

The fact of the matter is that Al Capone would have much rather done business amicably with his rivals, however, his rivals happened to be greedy and unreasonable people who initiated murderous acts against Al Capone's people over control of sales territories. Being that he was not able to seek protection from the authorities because of the nature of his business, he, like any reasonable person in the same situation, took matters into his own hands.

Some people argue that the nature of business that Al Capone engaged in was illicit, and that he was greedy and a ruthless businessman. The fact is, the government made illegal something that should not have been made illegal, and Al Capone was the pioneer in bootlegging operations as a result. People caught on and wanted to take away what he worked to accomplish, in providing spirits to a deprived market.

The next time you enjoy a cold beer, or a stiff mixed, you can probably thank Al Capone for his defiance and perseverance during prohibition. It probably had some influence on the repeal of prohibition. The next time you buy a gallon of milk for your family, and you check the date to make sure it's safe to drink, you can definitely thank Al Capone for that. A little food (and wine) for thought.